11 April 2009

Thailand Purchased Frigates From China

1995

Chao Phraya Frigate

Chao Phraya class frigate (photo : Worldwarships)

Thailand has purchased four Chinese Jianghu-class FFGs and two improved Type IV frigates. The frigates, two being of the Chinese-made F25T class, were designed and built by the China State Shipbuilding Corp in Shanghai. The type IV frigates are HTMS Taksin (delivered in November 1995) and HTMS Naresuan. The four Jianghu-class FFGs are the HTMS Bang Pakong, HTMS Chao Phraya (delivered in 1991), HTMS Saiburi, and HTMS Kraburi . The ships were purchased at "friendship prices" of 2,000 million baht each, compared to the 8,000 million baht price tag for Western-built frigates.

Apparently, these frigates proved less than impressive to the Thai Navy. The quality of workmanship of the frigate was said to be inferior, and considerable rework was needed to bring the vessels up to acceptable standards. The ability of the ships to resist battle damage was extremely limited, and damage control facilities were virtually non-existent. Fire-suppression systems were rudimentary, and it appeared that were the hull breached rapid flooding would quickly lead to the loss of the ship.

Naresuan Frigate

Naresuan class frigate (photo: Worldwarships)

Thailand purchased four Chinese Jianghu-class FFGs and two improved Type IV frigates. The frigates, two being of the Chinese-made F25T class, were designed and built by the China State Shipbuilding Corp in Shanghai. The type IV frigates are HTMS Taksin (delivered in November 1995) and HTMS Naresuan. The four Jianghu-class FFGs are the HTMS Bang Pakong, HTMS Chao Phraya (delivered in 1991), HTMS Saiburi, and HTMS Kraburi . The ships were purchased at "friendship prices" of 2,000 million baht each, compared to the 8,000 million baht price tag for Western-built frigates.

Apparently, these frigates proved less than impressive to the Thai Navy. The quality of workmanship of the frigate was said to be inferior, and considerable rework was needed to bring the vessels up to acceptable standards. The ability of the ships to resist battle damage was extremely limited, and damage control facilities were virtually non-existent. Fire-suppression systems were rudimentary, and it appeared that were the hull breached rapid flooding would quickly lead to the loss of the ship.

Sumber :
Global Security

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